BETWEEN A SLUM AND A HARD PLACE: AUSTRALIA GALLERIES OPENING

You are invited to the opening of Richard Goodwins’ latest collection of work, ‘Between a slum and a hard place’ on Tuesday 30th of November from 6-8pm at Australia Galleries.

Goodwin will show a series of new sculptures and relics from his performance ‘Alien’.

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DAILY TELEGRAPH, ‘TESTING THE CITY LIMITS’ BY ELIZABETH FORTESCUE

Alighting from a ferry at Circular Quay one day last month, artist and architect Richard Goodwin expected to be arrested at any moment. He didn’t have to wait long for a bit of action…
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Real-Time Porosity: Laneways

PROJECT IV:

Real-Time Porosity: Laneways Project 7 Meter Bar

Dates: 2009

Funding: City of Sydney, “By George! 2009 Hidden Networks”

Australian Research Council Linkage Grant

 

Artist: Richard Goodwin in Collaboration with Russell Lowe and Adrian McGreggor

Assistants: Julian Cromarty, Tina Salama, Vinh Nguyen, Joshua Harle

Videos: Laneways Computer-Game Visualisation

7 Meter Bar

 

Today 2/6/09 it was reported that the oceans are becoming more acidic. This is yet another in a series of markers on the road to irreversible damage of our environment.

So do we raise the bar?

Do we build a parasite bar in a laneway?

The bar being a reading of the depth of water as the ice-caps melt.

At 7m meters Underwood Street will be flooded with tidal surges and the flotsam and jetsam of our civilisation. As a collaboration the work combines the landscape of weather with the physicality of the architecture of catastrophe and the technology of games.

The bar responds to visiting crowds and their collective inaction with the force of virtual weather. This weather projected through digital beamers and broadcast through sound speakers in the installation builds in its ferocity as a response to increasing numbers.

Real-Time Porosity

PROJECT III:

Real-Time Porosity: Using Computer Gaming Technology to Map and Analyse Pedestrian Movement in Public and Private Space

Dates: 2009-2012

Funding: Australian Research Council Linkage Grant

The University of New South Wales in Collaboration with the Emergency Information Co-ordination Unit, New South Wales State Government

Artist: Richard Goodwin in Collaboration with Russell Lowe

Assistants: Julian Cromarty, Tina Salama, Vinh Nguyen, Joshua Harle

Videos: Real-Time Porosity Town Hall

PROJECT III:

Real-Time Porosity: Using Computer Gaming Technology to Map and Analyse Pedestrian Movement in Public and Private Space

Dates: 2009-2012

Funding: Australian Research Council Linkage Grant

The University of New South Wales in Collaboration with the Emergency Information Co-ordination Unit, New South Wales State Government

Artist: Richard Goodwin in Collaboration with Russell Lowe

Assistants: Julian Cromarty, Tina Salama, Vinh Nguyen, Joshua Harle

Videos: Real-Time Porosity Town Hall

Real-Time Porosity

In 2003-5 Richard Goodwin’s Porosity project took a snapshot of the public use of private space in Sydney’s CBD. By employing sensors that feed information from real environments, computer gaming technology will let us experience Porosity in real time and in first person. The result will provide many new ways to experience, test, observe, archive, review and assist people’s movement through space, however, the danger is that it might be mistaken for a non-serious, purely recreational computer game. Mistaking real time Porosity for entertainment is what Paul Virilio would call its “accident”. But with the incredible growth and popularity of computer games could this accident have unintended, and useful, implications? We think so.

Porosity

PROJECT I:

Porosity: The revision of public space in the city using public art to test the functional boundaries of built form.

Dates: 2003-2005

Funding: Australian Research Council Discovery Grant

Artist: Richard Goodwin

Assistants: Tia Chim, Nadia Wagner, Sarah Jamison, Rob Besson,

Video: What a Building Desires

 

Richard Goodwin’s Porosity project tests the functional boundaries ascribed to the physical dimensions of public space in the city and envisions new possibilities for urban metamorphosis.

The Porosity Project conducted from 2003-2005, supported by an Australian Research Council Discovery Grant aimed to do this via the device of public art and a methodology of comprehensive mapping of both internal and external spaces in Sydney. A series of performative experiments were conducted on the urban fabric of corporate-private architecture in which porosity researchers entered foyers, lift-shafts and hallways, staying as long as possible without intruding on occupants and attempting to remain unnoticed by security. Goodwin named spaces of public possibility within the corporate-private skin chiastic spaces. Over a period of three years, the researchers documented their discoveries on chiastic spaces including information regarding population, movement and architectural materiality to produce a porosity index. The resulting index gave a figure, which could be used to compare the degree of ‘publicness’ within the traditionally private boundary of the exterior architectural skin.

Porosity Indexes, in conjunction with a tri-part series of chiastic models produced a series of evocative images and animations exploring the possibility of connection between internal zones of public potentiality. These projections constitute a sketch for an urban metamorphosis based on existing buildings and a philosophy of parasitic-prosthetic architectural interventions. The move undermines an existing fetish with the pedestal building as well as compromising the increasingly closed body of architecture in the age of terror. For Goodwin, however, to interconnect and adapt existing architectural bodies in a way that produces a porous urban architecture not only creates a richer social fabric but is also a direct and efficient intervention, sustainably allowing for existing cities to expand in symbiotic metamorphosis.

Porosity Games

PROJECT II:

Porosity Games

Dates: 2006-2007

Videos: Snakes and Ladders, Hide and Seek, Jenga

Artist: Richard Goodwin

Assistants: Maria Capussela,Tia Chim, Louise Hoelzl, Nicole Leuning, Kris Bird

Visualisations: Robert Beson, Tia Chim, Jimmy Gunawan, Gabriele Ulacco

Players: Maria Capussela, Ada Fung, Catherine Hartung, Marion Hertford, Amie Hu, Sarah Jamieson, Karl Logge, Tessa Rappaport, Huong Tang, Nadia Wagner, Richard Wong

Camera: James Rickard

Editor: Samar Kauss

Sound: David Sims

Images:

 

Porosity Games

The Porosity Games refer to three art actions undertaken to interrogate the Porosity research conducted under an Australian Research Council Discovery Grant from 2003-2005. The games interrogate porosity findings as well as continue the lineage of a performative identification of the functional boundaries of public and private space. Goodwin decided early in his research for this project, that the mechanism of these interrogations should take the form of a series of games. Games are extremely refined structures, richly socially encoded and developed to produce results, or temporary solutions to a problem.

Porosity seeks the dissolution of architecture through a type of mapping which dissolves existing boundaries associated with the rights of access. This is primarily a simple manipulation of perception and time, which begs the question: ‘how long is ownership?’ It was Goodwin’s intention to build on a lineage of performative urban interrogation from the Dada-ist deambulation to the Situationist transurbances in order to affect our perceptions of the city, and further affect the actual fabric. To do this Goodwin invented three art actions in the form of common, culturally ingrained games: Snakes and Ladders, Hide and Seek and Jenga. Each game was played at an urban scale as a tool to interrogate both Porosity research and the city itself.

The outcomes of this body of work, test and prove the hypothesis of the original porosity thesis and its associated ‘Porosity Index’. The games also act as independent art projects. Public art is a powerful mechanism of architectural interrogation due to its innately symbiotic relationship with built form. Further, the marginality of public art makes it ideally suited to the task of commenting on or contradicting the main body of the text of a culture.